CDC Content Warning

This website and accompanying blogs may contain content only suitable for adults.

Since HIV infection is spread primarily through sexual practices or by sharing needles, prevention messages and programs may address these topics. HIV prevention materials funded by CDC must be approved by local program review panels. However, some viewers may consider the materials controversial.

OK

March 2014

25
Mar

Why Testing Together Is Important

Concurrent Partnerships and HIV Risk Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in New York City

 

A study in NYC shows that concurrent partnerships are a significant public health concern among men who have sex with men (MSM). The study describes the prevalence of concurrency and its association with serodiscordant/serostatus unknown unprotected anal or vaginal intercourse (SDUI) among MSM in New York City.

 

A total of 1458 MSM completed a social and sexual network inventory about their male and female sex partners, including concurrency, in the last 3 months. Logistic regression identified factors associated with SDUI.

 

29 – The median age of the participants.

23.5% – The proportion of participants who reported being HIV+.

3.2 – The reported mean of male partners in the last 3 months.

16.6% – The proportion of MSM who reported having recent SDUI.

63.2% – Described having concurrent sex partners (individual concurrency based on overlapping dates of relationships).

71.5% –  reported having partners whom they believed had concurrent partners (perceived partner concurrency).

56.1% – reported that both they and their partners had concurrent partners (reciprocal concurrency).

 

Among HIV+ men by self-report, having SDUI was positively associated with individual concurrency, any alcohol use during sex, having more male sex partners, and not having a main partner. Among self-reported HIV− men, having SDUI was positively associated with perceived partner concurrency, lower education level, any alcohol and drug use during sex, having more male sex partners, and having an anonymous partner.

 

Concurrency was common among MSM. The association of SDUI with individual and perceived partner concurrency, along with substance use during sex, having an anonymous partner, and having many sex partners likely further increases HIV acquisition and transmission risk among MSM. HIV prevention interventions should address concurrency among MSM.

 

Ready to get tested? Click here to schedule your appointment.

10
Mar

National Women & Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Womenshealth.gov - National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day March 10,2014

 

HIV/AIDS is a serious public health issue for women and girls. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1.1 million people in the United States are living with HIV. Of those people, one in four (25%) is a woman 13 or older. Approximately 27,000 women have HIV but do not know they have the disease.

 

National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is a nationwide observance that sheds light on the disease’s impact on women and girls.

 

Encourage the women and girls in your life to get tested and know their status. Project HIM offers free & confidential HIV & STD screening here in Central Iowa. Click here to go to our get-tested page to schedule an appointment.

 

Learn more by visiting this website:

National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day | womenshealth.gov.

6
Mar

HIV AIDS Study: No transmission with undetectable viral load, gay or straight.

infographic

Viral load suppression means risk of HIV transmission is ‘at most’ 4% during anal sex, but final results not due till 2017.

 

The second large study to look at whether people with HIV become non-infectious if they are on antiretroviral therapy (ART) has found no cases where someone with a viral load under 200 copies/ml transmitted HIV, either by anal or vaginal sex.
Statistical analysis shows that the maximum likely chance of transmission via anal sex from someone on successful HIV treatment was 1% a year for any anal sex and 4% for anal sex with ejaculation where the HIV-negative partner was receptive; but the true likelihood is probably much nearer to zero than this.
When asked what the study tells us about the chance of someone with an undetectable viral load transmitting HIV, presenter Alison Rodger said: “Our best estimate is it’s zero.”
Click here to read an in-depth report

Related topic: FACT SHEET: Undetectable Viral Load