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Tag: hiv prevention

28
Sep

Here’s What’s Up: Week of September 28th

It is the last week of September, it seemed like the month just flew by.

Last Saturday’s mobile testing event was a success.  We’ve provided 32 rapid HIV test.  We want to thank The Blazing Saddle, The Garden Nightclub, and other businesses in the East Village for their support.


Free HIV/STI Testing

This week’s testing clinic schedule is as follows:

Primary Health Care – Des Moines (1200 University Avenue)

  • Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
  • Tuesday 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
  • Friday 9:00 – 2:00 pm

Primary Health Care – Ames Clinic (3510 Lincoln Way)

  • Monday – Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm (HIV test only, no STI screening available at this time. No appointments needed.)

LOL – Live Out Loud 2015

Sunday, November 8 from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. (Doors open @ 6:30)

 Wooly’s (504 E Locust St, East Village)

Enjoy live music and exclusive performances from Des Moines’ best entertainers.
Spend your Sunday evening with The Project and celebrate nearly 3 decades of the community coming together to improve the lives of people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS.

Purchase your tickets today by filling out the form below. 

4
Aug

What’s The First Thing I Need To Know Before Starting PrEP?

You should know your status!

Before starting PrEP

You must be HIV-1 negative and stay HIV-1 negative before starting a PrEP. That is why you must:

  • Get tested to be sure you are HIV-1 negative. It is important that you also get tested at least every 3 months as recommended by your healthcare provider while on PrEP.
  • Not be on PrEP to reduce the risk of getting HIV unless you are confirmed to be HIV-1 negative.
  • Have no symptoms like feeling weak or tired, fever, sweating a lot (especially at night), rash, vomiting, diarrhea, joint or muscle aches, headache, sore throat, or enlarged lymph nodes in your neck or groin.
  • Be prepared to commit to adopting safer sex practices, such as correct use of condoms, limiting your sexual partners, knowing the HIV status of your sexual partners, and regular testing for HIV-1 (at least every 3 months) and other sexually transmitted infections, such as syphilis and gonorrhea.
  • make sure you understand the risks and benefits of taking a PrEP indication, such as Truvada, and you have spoken with your healthcare provider about questions and concerns.

Related posts: (Re) Introducing PrEP

Source: Important Safety Information About TRUVADA for a Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Indication For Uninfected Individuals (Gilead Health Sciences, Inc.)
31
Aug

A Pill To Prevent Getting HIV?

I’ve heard about a pill you can take to keep from getting HIV. How do I get a prescription like that?

Good, you heard about TRUVADA, the pill recently recommended for daily use to prevent HIV infection. This pill is a combination of the two HIV drugs emtricitabine and tenofovir and the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) is now considering its final approval for prevention of HIV in those at high risk for getting HIV. Two recent studies showed the risk of getting HIV was cut 42% in healthy gay and bisexual men who also had counseling and used condoms and another study showed that the rate of HIV in heterosexual couples where one was HIV positive was cut by 75%. These studies showed that DAILY use of the drug was very important as those taking the drug less regularly had higher rates of infection.

So is it as simple as taking a pill a day? Not really.

There has been a lot of debate, like will it actually increase the rates of HIV because people may take more risks? Who’s going to pay for it? Will money spent on this take money away from treating those with HIV? How do we get people to take it daily? How do we convince people to keep using condoms? What about women who don’t seem to have as good a response to this medicine? What about side effects from the medication and drug interactions?

In spite of all the controversy, TRUVADA is a new and possibly very important tool to fight HIV, which can be added onto what you are already doing (condoms, safer sex activities), but remember it does NOT prevent HIV 100% of the time, it can be very expensive ($900.00 a month), may not be covered by insurance and needs to be taken daily.

If you are at risk for getting HIV, it is important for you to talk this over with your doctor or other health care provider, as only the two of you can decide if this is the right thing for you. Do it soon!

5
Jul

Message from Greg- July 2013

Greg - HIV Program DirectorProject HIM debuted Troy’s video at Pride. In the video, Troy shared that someone he slept with had been with an HIV + partner and that he was nervous about the possible risk of HIV. What wasn’t shared was that Troy was nervous because he’d slipped up and had sex without a condom with the guy he slept with.

This omission caused a stir on Project HIM’s Facebook page. Some comments on Facebook made it clear that there were people living with HIV that were hurt by the content of the video. A few of the comments became heated to the point where battle lines were drawn between those who are HIV-positive and those who work to prevent HIV. (To read all the comments, see the June 9th post on Project HIM’s Facebook page. Link)

Divisiveness hurts us all.

We apologize to those who were hurt by the video. Project HIM staff care about people –whether you’re positive, negative, or don’t know your status. In response to the expressed hurt, the video was temporarily disabled.

Truth be told, there’s more to the video. Another segment that explains Troy’s slip ups and gives some background about Troy isn’t through with our videographer’s refinements yet. When it is, the two segments of the video will be presented together.

Notably, all the videos produced by Project HIM and any educational materials we distribute undergo a mandatory review process by the Materials Review Committee for the Iowa Department of Public Health. In addition, Project HIM’s advisory committee, a group of gay men of various ages, professional backgrounds, and varying HIV status, review and provide feedback on each video’s content.

Inevitably though, questions still surface: How do we react when the personal stories shared by others aren’t exactly how we (as HIV prevention staff) think we might respond (armed with the knowledge and experience of working in the field of HIV prevention)? Do we jump in and explain—or uphold the dignity and worth of each person’s story —as it is? There’s no perfect answer.

Each misstep is an opportunity for healing and change.

Project HIM hopes to make the hurt and anger —the underlying passion—a starting place for conversation. Do we have to stigmatize HIV in order to prevent HIV? How can we work together as a community? These are the questions we’d like to discuss at a forum this fall that brings together HIV prevention, HIV care, those living with HIV, and those who are not. We can’t move forward together if we don’t tackle the thorns that keep hurting us.

Before Troy’s story was debuted, Project HIM and its advisory committee developed the summer campaign “Know Pride. Know your status.” We wanted to take away the stigma of HIV status and emphasize the importance of knowing what your status is. A disproportionate amount of new HIV infections happen because of those who have HIV but don’t know it. People who are HIV +, know that they are, and are getting treatment, aren’t spreading the virus and chances are they’ll live a long and healthy life—just as Troy astutely notes at the end of his second video.

Pride is knowing. Pride is taking charge of your health—whether you’re negative or positive. At this critical time in history, having experienced the repeal the of DOMA, what better to do than to take pride in who we are and push the stigmas we’ve all felt to the periphery—while we move toward the center. Where we can stand united.